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The Collection of War Photos

Ukrainian resilience

Mrs. Rita goes outside. To the sounds of explosions from Russian guided aerial bombs, she treats people to pies with potatoes. Answering the question, “Where do you hide when there is shelling?” she replies, “Nowhere, we are just praying”. Avdiivka. November 8, 2023.

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Endless fields, steppes, and wildflowers. Hot military summer of 2023. Near Orichiv, the Zaporizhzhia region. June 25, 2023.

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Waiting for the artillery attack to end in one of the basements. There is a piano, and a soldier of the 93rd Separate Mechanized Brigade “Kholodnyi Yar ” plays it to the sounds of enemy shellings. Bakhmut. February 25, 2023.

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A girl waves the Ukrainian flag in the center of Kherson in the first days after the liberation of the city from Russian occupation. November 13, 2022.

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Military chaplains Maksym and Oleksandr consecrate paskas (Easter bread) at the positions of the 93rd Separate Mechanized Brigade “Kholodnyi Yar”. Velyka Komyshuvakha, the Kharkiv region. April 24, 2022.

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A bus on the street in the center of Lviv during a blackout caused by Russian missile attacks on Ukrainian energy infrastructure. October 10, 2022.

photo: Roman Baluk
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A volunteer holds a box of sandwiches at a volunteer center in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine. March 1, 2022.

Since the first days of the Russian invasion, people have been organizing themselves into volunteer centers to resist and help meet the needs of the military and internally displaced people. The largest volunteer center in Zaporizhzhia had about 500 members in the first months of the invasion. The main goal in the first two months was to defend the city: ordinary people made anti-tank hedgehogs and placed them on the main roads in the city.

photo: Elena Tita
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A volunteer sews a national flag at a volunteer center in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine. February 28, 2022.

Since the first days of the Russian invasion, people have been organizing themselves into volunteer centers in Zaporizhzhia to resist and help meet the needs of the military and internally displaced people. One of the largest centers in the city unites about five hundred people and includes a sewing department, a group that makes potbelly stoves, a department of humanitarian and medical aid, a group that makes trench candles for the military, and others.

photo: Elena Tita
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Ukrainian girl holds the Ukrainian flag at the volunteer center in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine. June 14, 2022.

Since the beginning of Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, Zaporizhzhia became the closest large city for many people escaping the Russian occupation. People began to unite in volunteer centers to resist and to help cover the needs of the military and internally displaced persons (IDPs). There are ofter children at the volunteer centers, whom parents-volunteers take with them and give simple tasks around the center.

photo: Elena Tita
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A group of female volunteers posing in front of camouflage nets in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine. November 17, 2022.

Since the beginning of Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, Zaporizhzhia became the closest large city for many people escaping the Russian occupation. People began to unite in volunteer centers to resist and to help cover the needs of the military and internally displaced persons (IDPs). There are at least ten places in the city that produce camouflage nets for the military, where volunteers, both residents of the city and IDPs, work.

photo: Elena Tita
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